You are here: Home / Our Research / Climate Impacts / The Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise

The Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise Program

Science to Guide Coastal Ecosystem, Community, and Infrastructure Protection

Rising sea level has worldwide consequences because of its potential to alter ecosystems and the vulnerability of coastal regions by increasing the prevalence of recurrent tidal flooding events and life-threatening storm surge events. Damages and economic losses due to sea level rise could be reduced if decision makers better understand the impacts of sea level rise and coastal inundation (storm surge, nuisance flooding, and/or wave run-up) and have access to science that provides insight on potential solutions. NOAA’s National Ocean Service program (NOS) provides data and tools that enable businesses and coastal communities to plan for an array of coastal hazards and events. The Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise Program (EESLR) is a NOS program that specifically provides a suite of science products to inform coastal managers of local coastal vulnerability and solutions to mitigate flood risk.

The Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise Program provides a suite of science products and tools useful to coastal managers that are capable of evaluating coastal vulnerability under multiple sea level rise, inundation, and coastal management scenarios. These tools allow coastal managers to prepare for or mitigate regional impacts of sea level rise in their specific region. EESLR projects principally, explore the vulnerability of natural ecosystems, evaluate the potential for natural structures (e.g., barrier islands, wetlands, etc.) to reduce coastal inundation, and develop best practices for the inclusion of ecosystems in coastal protection strategies. In many cases, fostering natural coastal features provides a cost effective alternative to rigid hardened structures that may not be as effective in reducing flood risk or maximizing the value of the coast to the local community.

Printable Fact Sheet

Current Projects

Prior Projects

News and Feature Archive

For more information, contact David Kidwell.